The Perfect Murder

Directed by Vikkramm Chandirramani  |  Review by Triptayan Chatterjee

A fragment of the complexity of life, a jigsaw puzzle arisen in the ambitious straight line of a lifestyle. One simple event can turn your life upside down and  The Perfect Murder by Vikkramm Chandirramani a perfect example put into a fictional perspective. The tag of war between the two people that happens in this short film heavily focuses on social interaction and to what horrific extremes our needs and desires can bring us. If you mix proper editing, camera usage with the right actors and plotline, the viewer almost doesn’t have to actually experience something to know how it feels. The work of fiction packs everything he or she needs to know (and feel) for you. 

The protagonist played by Rohan Gandotra is an ambitious man with a dream to be an actor. But as you can imagine, the road to fame isn’t smooth. As he ferociously tries to achieve his dream, Rohan faces heavy decisions. One solution creates another problem and instead of going for success, he founds himself on the road towards being desperate. And we know what a wounded animal is capable of.

But what’s interesting about The Perfect Murder is that unlike in other similar movies, the protagonist behaves a bit differently. Usually, desperate actions come from the person himself, but in this film, the so-called “trigger” takes a different route to ignite the fires of chaos. If you observe carefully, the unlucky protagonist might seem more like a weapon, a gun, rather than the gunslinger. This allows the movie to take completely new ways to not only surprise the viewer but also give him a new perspective on how to turn cliche stories into something refreshing. With this, we can say the movie isn’t only entertaining, but educational as well.

These definitions are uniquely narrated in this short flick. Every shot tells the fragmented story of the theme and finally culminates in a perfectly clear picture not just of us as individuals, but as a society as well. Similar as in Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, where the horror is masterfully mixed with irony and humor, so will you experience emotions that at first don’t seem to go together. At moments the film seems like a classic crime thriller while the second later it can feel like a classic drama and even a family drama you’d watch with your kids.

Here we can ask ourselves how is this possible? Well, it’s exactly the complexity of the human mind that gives that blazing punch to a story, same as it opens endless possibilities for a skilled filmmaker. Where one filmmaker will see a bottomless pit, another will see an endless well of inspiration. There’s isn’t a bad story, there are only bad filmmakers and Vikkramm Chandirramani proves he’s not one of them. Instead, he sees the potential in complexity, an opportunity in the absurd.

To summarize everything, the title of the film becomes oddly fitting. I’m not talking about an actual murder. Instead, this movie is “the perfect murder” of the mundane and boring filmmaking. The type of filmmaking that relies on bulletproof tactics and scares from swimming the untested waters.

Although the plot is simple, The Perfect Murder narrates it in a unique way, almost like a labyrinth you don’t mind exploring. Every scene moves the story forward and you’ll never feel like waiting and bored. The Camera runs in fresh and frank directions serving the same exact purpose. All this shows the director’s creativity and the willingness to discover new grounds. Is it dangerous? Yes, but if you want to create a perfect murder, you need to go where nobody else dares to go.

 

Triptayan is a filmmaker looking for a different horizon. Earlier a journalist Triptayan has done intensive research on film language and made different documentaries so far. He is now concentrating upon feature film in a vast landscape. Professionally a teacher, Triptayan has also passion for making films threaded with international and universal thoughts.