Los Angeles

Directed by Kishore Tummala  |  Review by Ananya Jana

In Los Angeles we follow Dave, a seamless stranger who accidentally bumps into a psychiatrist. In the beginning, he realizes there is a mystery, in the end, there is a confirmation. Mystery creates wonders and wonder is the basic man’s desire to understand.

The adrenalin rush of anger, like any other amphetamine effect, always crashes into some level of depression, at least in the form of self-doubt and energy depletion. He then uses a low-grade resentment to militate out of depressed mood – to gain temporary confidence and energy. Resentment keeps him partially aroused most of the time and highly susceptible to angry outbursts. The excess adrenalin and cortical in his bloodstream make it hard for him to sleep and more difficult to concentrate when awake. Often tired and distracted, he needs more anger for energy, focus, and motivation. He gets caught on a recurring roller-coaster of resentment-anger-depression-resentment-anger-depression. Chronic blame keeps him mired in victim-identity, which continually reignites the cycle.

The plot started with a mysterious guy who is busy with his own state of mind. His eyes and mind are not stable at all. By his first appearance, someone can easily understand he is wondering about something. At first, he just rushes with a lady then her phone blinked with someone’s message. He looked at it but didn’t give the importance – one can say that mysterious characters are like that. Again his phone rang and he talked. He is an exasperated stranger to Los Angeles and he bumps into a psychiatrist. He just entered the psychiatrist’s cabin, locked the door and turned the light off for a secret conversation. His problem is that he can’t sleep because of his nightmares.

Most people suffer from occasional nightmares and some seem to experience them almost every night. What exactly do these night terrors mean? Although nightmares can sometimes be random creations of the subconscious with no particular deeper interpretation, in many cases nightmares actually do have specific causes or meanings behind them. They can allow you to look deeper into your thoughts and feelings to get a better gauge of the current mental or emotional state.

He told the psychiatrist about his haunting nightmares due to his past deeds. From the anxious state of mind, he killed one of his closest friends because she talked too much and her grammar wasn’t good. With this kind of behavior, he proves that his present state of mind is not customary at all.

The psychologist was also surprised because of this kind of behavior and when he turned the table lamp on, he saw that the stranger is standing in front of his chair, holding a gun. The stranger takes a timer and asks the psychologist if the timer is set for 10 minutes. When he gets to know that timer is set for 3 minutes, he gives 3 minutes to the psychologist, but at that moment another patient knocks the door and the stranger tells him to leave and orders the psychologist to keep his mouth shut.

“The clock is running, make the most of today. Time waits for no one. Yesterday is a history, tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift.”

 

Ananya Jana finished her master degree in Journalism and mass communication. She is the event coordinator. She loves to explore different genres of movie. She is a passionate writer and believes that real writing equals authentical writing without the veneer and excuses in order to reach the audience at a heart level. She believes that when she writes she comes alive and the energy zaps. Her passion for writing focuses on character-driven plotlines.